Kirstie opening at Sabbia this week…

7 03 2009

La Gropp has just sent through the goods on Kirstie’s latest exhibition, which opens at Sabbia this coming week – sorry it’s a tad blurry, it’s scanned…

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invitation

[Wow!! We love Fran Kelly – our all time fave brekky radio diva. Bummer we can’t make it to the launch…Wednesday nights are devilish awkward. n(Ed)]

Stop press: There’ll be snaps in the near future, after all – Klausie’s volunteered to be our roving reporter on the night, so we’ll be there by proxy…Yee Har!

 

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If you’re hanging loose around the environs of Surry Hills this coming Wednesday then get on down.

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Procter par-tay at Sabbia…

25 09 2008

The Netster came through with the goods yesterday, having volunteered to be the Gang’s roving reporter at last Friday night’s opening of In Essence: The Legacy of Stephen Procter, at Sabbia. Once there however she got so caught up in the social swill that she almost forgot […don’t worry darl, happens to us all the time. n(Ed)] – so the flick around’s a wee bit truncated…

 

 

Doesn’t matter, it’s all good. Brennie’s piece (above) – and Brennie for that matter – feature large, which is only to be expected given the Gang’s own (entirely non-biblical) proclivities. And there’s a nice little core sample of the crowd – which was clearly Canberra-centric, as you can see…

 

   

          

         (click to enlarge)

Looks like everyone was having a lovely time. Jane wasn’t there after all, which was a shame (luckily we didn’t belt up to see her especially!!) – guess we’ll all just have to catch up with her OT.

Meanwhile, thanks Netty, dang good job ♥♥♥

 

                        





Procter Fellowship exhibition at Sabbia…

17 09 2008

 

The Gang thought long and hard about whether or not we’d get the skates back on to belt up to Sydney yet again – this time for the launch of the Procter Fellowship exhibition, In Essence: The Legacy of Stephen Procter, at Sabbia this coming Friday night – but in the end decided ag’in it.

It all looks a tad visually frenetic (less might have been more perhaps) and a couple of the artists selected triggered a veritable mexican wave of incredulous eyebrow raising (their specious claims that Stephen was an influence on their work and/or philosophic practice are tenuous AT BEST.) Anyhoo, enough said about that…[Megsie started to climb on to her soap-box for a rant, but we talked her down. n(Ed)]

 

 

On the positive side the exhibition promotes the continuing awareness of the all-important Procter Fellowship, set up after Stephen’s demise to provide an annual travelling/mentoring scholarship, and includes a number of the recipients (…further down the track it’d be great to see this developed into a regular happening, featuring perhaps just the work of Stephen and the ongoing progression of Fellows.)

The added inclusion of work by his old friends and early comrades-in-glass-arms (Ray Flavell and Joel Philip Myers), themselves so instrumental in Stephen’s own development, is a really nice touch – and a practical reminder of the efficasy of encouragement, support and engagement during the critical stages of an emerging artist’s evolving career.  And, of course, there’d be no show without Punch – Jane Bruce, who worked with Stephen during most of the period of his tenure as Head of the ANU School of Art Glass Workshop (and was instrumental in assisting Christine Procter in the foundation of the Fellowship) not only has work in the exhibition but is rumoured to be making the pilgrimage DownUnder in person.

So it promises to be a big, glossy affair with plenty of flesh pressing and, one hopes, lots of lovely lucre raised for the Fellowship coffers. For additional info go to the Sabbia website (though at this juncture we notice they’ve not yet uploaded the blurb – keep watch on that space…)





The Gang’s big Sydney adventure…Part 1

21 10 2007

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First stop: Goulburn and the Paragon Cafe.

Jacque and the Gang fanged it out of the car-park at the Hyatt and headed straight up the Federal Highway to Sydders, stopping only for a quick snap of the Big Merino and a burger at the Paragon in Goulburn.

We made the big smoke in good time to dump the luggage, tart ourselves up and wander down Oxford St to Brigitte’s exhibition (Core – ceramics and bronzes) at Sabbia (the raison d’être for the trip.) Fabulous exhibition – her first solo for 20 years, and it’s been in gestation for about half of that. This is seriously considered work – the real deal, darlings. We love it.

A commendable number of people trekked up from both the (Far South) Coast and Canberra to swell the predominantly Sydney crowd, including Nola Anderson who officially launched the show and Judi Elliot who was co-exhibiting in the little side gallery. A grand old time was evidently had by all – particularly those who went on to dinner afterwards…

And then of course the most dedicated amongst us dropped in at the Hollywood for a bitterly-cold on the way home…

For a perusal of the evening go to…(and we’ve also printed Megsie’s short blurb for the show for your edification – just ‘cos we can…!! See below.)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/glasscentralcanberra/sets/72157602572014455/

Core

 At the core of Brigitte Enders’ signature aesthetic formality lies a store of life experience, both professional and private, that sustains a resolute creative drive. The influence of her abiding predilection for architecture, and early training in Bauhaus-influenced German industrial design, is evidenced by the beautifully balanced, sophisticated restraint of her work, the strong purity of line and the diligent attention to detail. It is this sense of ‘the outer-shell’ of her ‘observances’ that most occupies, and perhaps defines, Enders’ practice. Her vessels contain, and even fortify, her most intimate thoughts and impressions. They are an exterior manifestation that guards the undisclosed essential. Perceiving her craft as ‘a composition in mood’, Enders’ bold move into the foundry most surely portends the longevity of a strong and intriguingly progressive artistic practice.  

Megan Bottari, 2007